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Villains Need Love Too – Part Two

January 10, 2018 | Writing

Star Wars- The Last Jedi has debuted. I saw it. No spoilers but I enjoyed it and was pleased I wrote about Darth Vader and Kylo Ren in part one on loving your villain.

I planned on editing and posting part two of my post on antagonists but of course there was Christmas, family, a seven-year-old granddaughter, and a flu bug that took me down Christmas night, right after The Doctor Who special, and left me weak and susceptible to every request made by my granddaughter. Like any good antagonist the bug discovered my physical weakness, manipulated it, and wore me down. I preserved like any good heroine, drank lots of water, vitamin C chewables, OTCs, and crawled under a blanket until my body defeated the evil. Of course it was 2018 by that time. So here’s part two.

Villains or antagonists are essential to your story. The hero needs a reason to move out of their ordinary world and the villain serves this purpose. Villains have a backstory, motivations, goals, and hopefully conflicts if you plan on redeeming them. If they aren’t conflicted by their actions, they should die like the dirty dog they are. You as a writer should know all of this even if it doesn’t make it onto the page or screen. Is your Andy going to be redeemed or are they going to die?

Casablanca is my favorite love story movie. I cry at the end every time I watch it. Humphrey Bogart is Rick, Ingrid Bergman is Ilsa, Claude Rains is Captain Renauit, Paul Henreid is Victor Laszlo, and Conrad Veidt is our villain Major Heinrich Strasser. Each actor was cast perfectly for their role.

In Casablanca Rick is the hero. He’s stoic, a loner off the grid, yet still has a soft spot for true love. His armor is rusty and he’s tired of the fight. He’s run away to Casablanca to hide his pain and make money. But his true love, Ilsa shows up – with her husband, Victor. And Victor is a real hero. Rick’s pain comes back, he turns on Ilsa. And then – cue the dark music, Major Strasser struts into Rick’s bar.

Vogler in Hero’s Journey says the hero’s entrance should tell you about them. The first behavior should be character. The same holds true for an Andy. Before Strasser enters the cafe, we already know details about him that prove when we finally meet this man he ain’t hero material. He’s in full dress uniform, medals on his chest, his posture is spine stretching straight. He’s always at attention. He pauses in the doorway of Rick’s cafe and draws everyone’s attention.

So who is he? He’s a high ranking German officer (bad), he’s a Nazi enforcer (double bad), his orders are to clean up Casablanca, find Victor Laszlo and escort him back to Germany (all very, very bad). Strasser is my Andy. He is the hero of his own story. He believes he’s right. He serves Nazi Germany and a believer in the Third Reich. Vogler suggests at least once going thru the story in the antagonist’s skin. Sometimes that’s difficult to do because writing bad people isn’t as much fun as writing nice people. How do they see themselves? The world? Strasser’s a winner and he’s about to capture the man who inspires others to rebel against tyranny.

Flip this for a moment. What if Strasser is a German officer fighting the Third Reich from within and comes to Casablanca to rescue Victor Lazlo? And Rick wants to turn Lazlo over to the Germans for money and have Isla for himself. Sends shivers down my spine. The change makes Strasser a hero, and Rick the …. Oh Hell, Andy.

But that’s not how the story goes. Strasser is Rick’s nemesis, the dark to Rick’s light. Rick’s original plan is to sit back and do nothing. But Strasser pushes him to take a stand. Why does Strasser choose Rick to intimidate? Rick is everything Strasser hates. An American who believes in freedom, equality. If Strasser can break Rick and take Laszlo back to Germany he’s succeeded in his assignment. Glory, honor, prestige. He will prove his worth to his superiors.

Rick faces off against Strasser. The dark moment, the last opportunity for Strasser’s redemption comes when he discovers Lazlo is leaving Casablanca. Rick gives him a chance to stop, warns him twice. Strasser sees his future success flying away, everything he’s work for, killed for, leaving and disgracing him. He’s probably never failed. He can’t, won’t be redeemed. He’s shot dead, not changing whatsoever in the movie. And I’m here to advocate that’s okay. Strasser’s role is not to change, his role is to push, make Rick see he needs to get back in fight. His final words to Ilsa make tear up. They don’t matter to a hill of beans compared to the fate of the world. Rick needs to abandon his safe sanctuary and return to fight taking Captain Renault with him. The beginning of a beautiful friendship.

But that’s okay. Not every Andy is redeemable. Darth Vader, redeemable, Loki, working both sides of good and bad, Voldemort, definitely unredeemable. As a writer once you fully know your Andy and have decided to kill or redeem them it should be written in a true fashion so the reader doesn’t roll their eyes in disbelief. Vader was forced to make a decision, let Luke die or save him. In that last moment Vader chose to save his son, sacrificing his own life. My antagonist, Richard, is not redeemable. He’s the force that makes Sophia decide whether she’s on the side of good or bad. But can she destroy him, without destroying herself? But first, my girl has to suffer.

The important thing is you have to build up to the villain’s black moment. Make them twist and turn, debate internally what their decision should be. You just can’t have them hand over the weapon after the hero/heroine says ‘You’re good, I know you are.’ After all the turmoil and destruction Andy has caused they can’t just say, ‘Okay you’re right.’ They have to struggle with what they’ve done, believe they must atone for their wrongs. Go to jail, lose the love they think they deserve.

So write your Andy like you love him.

Footnote: Conrad Veidt, the actor who portrayed Major Strasser was a strong advocate against Nazi Germany. His third wife was Jewish and he refused to renounce and divorce her. It meant he’d be blacklisted. So be it, he and his wife moved to Great Britain. He gave his life savings to the British government for the war effort. Veidt when cast in German roles insisted he be the villain.

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Villains Need Love Too: Part One and Star Wars

December 13, 2017 | Writing

Rant: Coupons. I clip coupons. What gets me is when I have to purchase two or three of an item to get my $1.00 off. Really? I’m a single person and buying extra means it stands a great chance of spoiling before I eat it.

Since it’s Star Wars week, month, I’ve written this blog with the movie in mind and heart. Part Two, next week, I’ve taken Christopher Vogler’s, Hero’s Journey, and flipped the script. It’s going to be the Antagonist’s Journey.

I love antagonists. I love writing them, following their downfall or redemption in movies and books. I want to know what makes them the way they are and why they’re so determined to destroy the protagonist. Is it for love, money, power, fame? What motivates them? How far will the hero/heroine go to defeat the bad guy?

Villain, antagonist by any other name is still the same. The character who opposes your protagonist. I’m going to call them, Andy (male) or Andi (female). Andy(i) is my favorite character to mold. They’re dark, and damnable. Their purpose is to provide motivation for the protagonist. Push, shove them out of their ordinary life and off to battle a person, event, or even themselves. Make them grow from the experience, find a solution, take a chance on love.

So what about Andy(i)? What is their motivation? Why are they so eager to spread discord, attempt to kill your protagonist, rule the world. They aren’t dumb. They’re the smartest person in the room – according to themselves. And they just might be. Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty, Harry Potter and Voldemort, Ripley and the Alien, Thor and Loki, Thor and his sister, Hela, Batman and The Joker (Heath Ledger to be specific), my ex-roommate. They are yin and yang. You can’t have one or an interesting read without the other.

Let’s look at Darth Vader or as he was known when he didn’t have replaceable parts, Anakin Skywalker. Anakin’s future was foretold when he was young, to bring balance to the force. But also, as Yoda pointed out, he could destroy it as well. Which could be interpreted as destroying the established order to create a new better order. Obi-Wan trained him. Palpatin took over won Anakin’s soul and everlasting allegiance and turned him to the dark side using his greatest fear – Padame’s death. As Pamala Kinney, a Facebook friend, pointed out Palpatin was truly evil. Not a redeemable bone in his mutilated body. So we root for him to die. It takes one more film for that to happen. I won’t spoil how and who does it.

As for his young apprentice, Vader takes his role serious kill without conscience, wipe out any opponent to the plan to bring order to the galaxy – their vision. Luke Skywalker comes of age, seeks adventure, learns his father was a Jedi and wants to be just like him. He finally gets the opportunity to battle Vader and what’s his reward? His hand cut off and delivered the absolute worse news a hero wants to hear. “Luke I am your father.” Vader then doubles down, if Luke joins him they can rule the galaxy as father and son, and defeat the Emperor. I would have demanded a paternity test. But wait, isn’t this same spiel Anakin gave Padame? When Obi-Wan confronted Anakin they engaged in a verbal battle on the definition of good. Obi can’t convince Anakin he’s on the wrong side, and Anakin believes Obi-Wan is wrong and if he can’t convince his mentor well, he’ll just have to kill him. Obi-Wan stops short of killing Anakin. He does destroy half of Anakin’s body. Palpatine’s arrives and saving and rebuilding Anakin only cements their father-son relationship.

Luke decides there is still good in his father and will save him. The dark moment as defined in Vogler now motivates a change in the mission. Still defeat the Empire, but Luke won’t kill his father. He senses good. I’d have gone for the kill.

So is there a redemption possibility for Kylo Ren? If I were writing Star Wars Episode Nine, he’s dead.

When writing Resurrection I used the Hero’s Journey to create my Andy. First I needed his backstory. Richard Jensen from the outside looks like a great guy. He’s handsome, rich, owns his own business, is respected, charming, and has the boy next door act down. But underneath he’s damaged goods. All his life he’s been bullied by his arrogant, emotionally abusive, skirt-chasing father. He wants to be better than his father, he wants to prove to everyone how powerful he is, and has the knowledge to make the world a better place. According to how he views the world, witches and non-witches both. He’s going to have it all and the love of a woman equal to himself.

Richard chooses my protagonist, Sophia Sullivan, as the only woman who fits his strict standards. Problem is she’s in love with someone else. What’s a great guy to do? He joins forces with a powerful evil to destroy her family, kill her boyfriend, and take over Chicago. Because….. he knows all those things are wrong for her. She needs to see the big picture from his point of view. If he isolates her from everything she ‘thinks’ she loves and values, then she’ll love him and they’ll live happily ever after in his kingdom.

Okay, okay, Sophia’s not totally naive as to Richard’s antics but she finds it difficult to believe the man who has been a close male friend for years and whose shoulders she leaned on when her brother died is up to nefarious behavior and she’s being manipulated. She sees the good in him, until it’s almost too late. Will she join him? Kill him? And just how angry will she be when she figures it all out?

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Cordwainers and Writers

November 19, 2017 | Writing

Rant: Commercials for mascara. Cosmetic companies advertise that their product will make your lashes longer and fuller. Wow! Really? Not really. If you read the small print at the bottom of the screen you’ll read the model has lash inserts. You need the mascara AND additional lashes to get the full effect.

Okay, rant over. Now to the topic at hand. Cordwainers and writers. Cordwainer is the proper name for a shoemaker. Let’s begin with why my addled brain sees a connection. My gold standard for shoe shopping, Nordstrom, on Michigan Avenue in Chicago. Every time I come home I am required to make at least one visit, maybe two, okay three. I also have to hit up the cosmetics and Eileen Fisher departments. I walk in, drop to my knees, tears run down my face, not ruining my waterproof, long lash mascara, and cry out ‘I’m home!’ Nope, I don’t want to be carried out before I spend my money. But my mascara does holds up.

The only other time I feel like this is when I walk into a book store. It’s almost orgasmic.

I digress – as usual. So into Nordstrom I walk, my irises enlarge, and to my left is the beginning of their awesome shoe department. It extends the length of the first floor. Bright lighting, shoe displays catching your attention inviting you to walk around, pick up the precious, check the heel height, color, price, and ask ‘Do you have this in my size?’ You mentally calculate if you can afford to purchase one, two, or five pair. Same response in a book store. I pick up books as I wander from aisle to aisle seeking out my favorite authors and possibly new ones.

FYI: Unless you can afford it, don’t go to the back of the shoe department. I’m talking house payment prices. So far never had this problem in a book store – until I reach the register.

Cordwainers and writers do the same thing. Create.

Shoemakers spend long, hard hours drawing designs. They study how to create a shoe, work as interns for shoe companies and designers, determine their market, the demographics and age of potential customers.

Writers learn how to write, what genre they believe they can write well, plot out stories, create characters and give them goals, motivations, and conflicts. Long, hard hours to bring a book to life. We write for a specific group of readers historical romance readers, paranormal readers, gay readers. We look for our tribe.

More similarities. Shoemakers research shoe trends, seasons, potential markets. Writers study an ever-changing publishing landscape. Shoemakers create samples (writers first, second drafts) try them out on models (Beta readers). They haul their portfolio around, send emails (query) to companies (publishers and editors) and make presentations (pitches). They might strike out on their own (self-publish) like Vince Camuto once designed for Jessica Simpson. We both want one, just one company to look at (read) our design (manuscript) buy (contract) and stamp their name on a shoe (book). Thus creating a brand. Both want great sales, fantastic reviews, low returns, repeat sales, and loyal customers who spread the word about how great a writer/shoemaker we are.

It’s hard work. Commitment to the craft is our number one obsession. Rejection, years of ‘I’m sorry but I don’t think your book (shoe) fit our needs’. But we still write, commitment becomes more like maybe we should be committed.

But when it happens. Oh BABY when it happens! When we see our book in print whether ebook or paperback, on a shoe/book shelf we burst with pride. We’ve arrived. But we don’t rest on our laurels or kick off our new shoes, we keep writing. More books and of course more shoes.

A sample of my debut novel, Resurrection, is available below.

[ READ A SAMPLE ]

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2016 Where Are They Now?

January 30, 2016 | Writing

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I chose the photo because I believe this is what 2016 is all about. Climbing mountains, pulling ourselves up. 2015 seemed to pass in a blur. I remember taking down Holiday decorations, putting the tree up again, with my granddaughter’s assistance, and reluctantly taking them down again. There were 365 days, twelve months, right?

I do remember blogging about a group of unpublished writers and telling (warning them) I’d return at the end of the year to see what were their accomplishments. They did not disappoint. They worked and their successes inspire me.

My authors were LeAnne, Shaila, Tracey, Renita, Ane Ryan, Tina, and Edwina. I didn’t have as many questions as the first time around but their answers were filled with multiple achievements.

Of course I asked if they’d found time to write on a consistent basis. LeAnne experienced what happens to many of us when we carve out writing time, an emotional event interrupts our schedule. Her two beloved dogs died within four days of each other. Grieving sucks the creativity out of a person. She’s back to writing after giving herself time to heal from her loss. Shaila has a novel under contract and Tracey’s first book is being published and she’s discovered promotion eats into writing time. She did use NaNoMorWrit to get words down. Ane said she adjusted her writing schedule to aid productivity. She lowered her daily goal, takes weekends off, and discovered a five day work week works. I do the same thing. Weekends I read, have lunch with friends, and do laundry. Tina writes on a consistent basis and Edwina has two small children and teaches. Writing is difficult but she’s trying. Renita writes evenings for two to three hours and five hours on the weekend.

NaNoWriMore was a big event for writers in November. I didn’t make goal. I barely got out of the starting gate. LeAnne didn’t because of her loss, Tracey flushed out SEVENTY-THREE thousand words for the next book in her Finder’s Keeper’s series, Ane and Tina won NaNoWriMore. Tina had excellent advice, she turned off her internal editor and words flowed. Renita had surgery and in my opinion it barely slowed her down, she wrote FIFTY thousand words. November is the end of the quarter for Edwina, so it was difficult to write. Pesky students and grading.

As for accomplishments, this group had many successes in 2015. Shaila created her website and started a social media platform, joined a RWA group, attended RWA in New York, pitched, found and agent and was contracted by the end of the year. Tracey submitted to an indie publisher and has a book, Shocking Finds, coming out. She also wrote a short story for an anthology. Ane has submitted, been rejected, and continues to submit. She’s not willing to give up. Tina is looking into self-publishing and has made fantastic progress on her series. The first book finaled in The Molly and a full was requested. Edwina won the ancient/medival/renaissance category in the Hearts through History RWA chapter. Her first win. LeAnne had a good year, second place in IGO contest and made it to the second stage of Harlequin’s Blurb 2 Book Contest. She sent a proposal to Harlequin and a full was requested. Renita was determined to find a critique partner and she found one who is published. She believes this new relationship will help her improve her writing.

As writers it’s important to mix with other writers. Tina, LeAnne, and Shaila attended RWA in New York. Shaila and LeAnne pitched. Tina volunteered at local conferences. Tracey volunteered at the Rebels and Readers conference and Ane attended local workshops and a writers retreat. Renita and Edwina plan on attending RWA in San Diego this year. So do I because the following week is Comic Con. Might as well attend two great events for one round trip airline and hotel fare.

Shaila, Tina, and I are using Scrivener. I took three of Gwen Hernandez’s, the Scrivener Guru, classes and I love this writing program. I recommend the program and Gwen.

I ALWAYS ask what tidbit of advice they are willing to pass on.
Shaila – Just do it!! Learn as much as you can.
Tracey – Give to Get! Don’t expect to have connections and helping hands fall into your lap
Ane – The only writer who fails is the writer who quits writing.
Tina – Quoted her local RWA chapter moto “Together We Can”

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